privacy, schools, technology

‘Another Brick in the Wall’ was written in 1979

Washington Times Editorial: Securing America’s schools

Though the benefits of creating maximum-security schools is questionable, the negative impact on young minds is undeniable. Surveillance cameras would watch a child’s every move from kindergarten through high school. GPS devices would track them, and biometric scanners and identification cards would ensure compliance with all attendance regulations. This normalizes a police state. Instead of learning self-reliance, kids would grow up with a state-supplied — and illusory — security blanket.

Schools knowing where students are and whether or not they are attending class discourages self-reliance? Does using technology for the purpose change its nature?

Just remember ‘Another Brick in the Wall’ was released in 1979. High technology isn’t a necessary (or sufficient) condition for police state normalization.

On another note, and in the wake of recent events, a school system in Illinois is dusting off a previously shelved plan to use biometrics to restrict access to schools to those who have been vetted beforehand:

Dist. 201 plans to launch more safety measures (Morris Daily Herald – Illinois)

The district will also re-investigate biometric thumbprint scanning systems for the vestibule, a program they began looking at a year ago.

If the system were used, all parents/guardians would provide a digital thumbprint during school registration. Along with a photo ID, the fingerprint would be in the district’s computer system. Once inside the vestibule, the parent would scan their thumb and staff would pull up the person’s photo at the same time.

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